I am a cell and molecular biologist, researcher, scientist, nerd, hopeless romantic, music lover, Osage/Kaw/Cherokee of Oklahoma, and this will serve its purpose.

 

the-science-llama:

Octopus Embryo

Octopus bimaculoides, age approx 1 month. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy with fluorochromes Alexa 546 phalloidin - actin/muscle and To-Pro3 Alexa 642 - DNA. 5x (0.6 zoom) Maximum Intensity Projection.

the-science-llama:

Octopus Embryo

Octopus bimaculoides, age approx 1 month. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy with fluorochromes Alexa 546 phalloidin - actin/muscle and To-Pro3 Alexa 642 - DNA. 5x (0.6 zoom) Maximum Intensity Projection.

staceythinx:

Some of the fascinating images from the Kuriositas gallery Under the Electron Microscope. Check it out for more photos and a great explanation of the techniques used to get them. Click on the images above for descriptions of what’s pictured.

invisiblebee:

mememolly:

plant-a-day:

Sensitive Plant

Mimosa pudica

"Pudica" is the Latin word for "shy" or "bashful," which is an apt description of the sensitive "Touch-Me-Not." Native to South and Central America, this shade-lover often grows as a weed under trees and shrubs. It is popular among collectors as a specimen plant worldwide, because of its unique sensitivity to touch.

The foliage retracts when touched to prevent consumption by herbivores, and it also exhibits nyctinastic movement, meaning circadian rhythms affect the leaves to close at night, and re-open during the day. 

This trait is present in many other members of the legume family as well.

- biodiverseed

this. is. wild.

I used to grow this all the time! Such a cute plant.

What has been going on with me personally? I have been making my life more positive and productive while healing from whiplash and adjusting to my Invisalign treatment. After a lot of thought and prayer, I ended a toxic relationship in the new year and soon met someone at coffee who quickly turned into the most important person in my life. My family tells me they have never seen me happier.

I meet my man’s parents soon, which he assures me is a big deal reserved for someone he is considering for marriage. I have already met many of his cousins. I’m waiting to introduce him to my parents until after then and he has already met my sister and brother in law. He is in the same field of work as my brother in law so they hit it off instantly. My sister actually likes him which has never happened with my boyfriends.

He takes care of me when I am sick, treats me to romantic dinners, and makes me feel like his one and only special person. We could talk for hours and do. We both have our own lives and hobbies. I have my family (niece), my cat and apartment, yoga, a job I love, and a great group of friends (love ya’ll!). He has his family, friends, a great job, a home he owns himself, and plays football. I was relieved when he loved my cooking and reciprocated his feelings for me in a way that left no doubt in my mind that he loves me and only me. We have a cultural connection since he is mixed indigenous and Spaniard from Mexico. We talk about marriage, our future children, and traveling constantly. We are planning a trip to Spain. I’m just overwhelmed with happiness and have to share with the universe. Last night I was helping him get his suits ready for a business meeting and conference. It feels good to be in love with such an amazing, confident, and motivated person.

asylum-art:

asylum-art:

Slow Life from Daniel Stoupin

"Slow" marine animals show their secret life under high magnification. Corals and sponges are very mobile creatures, but their motion is only detectable at different time scales compared to ours and requires time lapses to be seen. These animals build coral reefs and play crucial roles in the biosphere, yet we know almost nothing about their daily lives.Watch the Video

Slow Life from Daniel Stoupin on Vimeo.

thatscienceguy:

Amazing electron microscope imagery! (some of these have been artificially colored)

More Sciency Galleries - http://thatscienceguy.bestgalleries.me/

digitalmovie:


this is me about 98 percent of the time.

digitalmovie:

this is me about 98 percent of the time.

scientificvisuals:

Microscopic life in a single drop of pond water. Peter Matulavich/Science Photo Library. Source here (definitely watch).

honey-suckle-this:

sixpenceee:

Krista and Tatiana Hogan are craniopagus twins, meaning they’re connected at the head.

They share a structure that connects Krista’s thalamus to Tatiana’s. The thalamus is a double-lobed organ that plays important roles in processing sensory input and creating consciousness.

Since Krista’s and Tatiana’s thalami are connected, scientists and members of the Hogan family think the girls might view the world differently than the rest of us do.

For example, Dr. Cochrane believes the girls can see through each other’s eyes. He came to this conclusion after covering Krista’s eyes, placing electrodes on her head, and watched Krista’s brain respond after shining a light in Tatiana’s pupils.

Other times, one girl will be watching TV while the other is looking somewhere else. Suddenly, the twin not watching TV will start laughing at what’s happening onscreen.

Their “thalamic bridge” also affects their sense of taste. Krista is a ketchup fiend, but Tatiana hates the stuff. Once, Krista was eating ketchup, and Tatiana furiously tried to wipe it off her own tongue even though she wasn’t eating any ketchup herself.

Perhaps the strangest phenomenon of all is that the twins sometimes use the word “I” to describe both of themselves at once.

As of 2011, no one had run any conclusive tests on the girls and their odd condition. However, scientists who have observed their behavior and brain scans are flabbergasted and excited. While no one can say for sure at the moment, it really does seem Krista and Tatiana can share private thoughts and perceive what the other is sensing.

As someone who wants to study consciousness in the future, I can say this is one of the most extraordinary cases I have ever heard of. 

SOURCE

MORE WOW SCIENCE

this is fucking amazing

neurosciencestuff:

Turning science on its head
Harvard neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years of neuroanatomy on its head.
Myelin, the electrical insulating material in the body long known to be essential for the fast transmission of impulses along the axons of nerve cells, is not as ubiquitous as thought, according to new work led by Professor Paola Arlotta of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) and the University’s Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, in collaboration with Professor Jeff Lichtman of Harvard’s Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology.
“Myelin is a relatively recent invention during evolution,” says Arlotta. “It’s thought that myelin allowed the brain to communicate really fast to the far reaches of the body, and that it has endowed the brain with the capacity to compute higher-level functions.”
In fact, loss of myelin is a feature in a number of devastating diseases, including multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia.
But the new research shows that despite myelin’s essential roles in the brain, “some of the most evolved, most complex neurons of the nervous system have less myelin than older, more ancestral ones,” said Arlotta, co-director of the HSCI neuroscience program.
What this means, she said, is that the higher one looks in the cerebral cortex — closer to the top of the brain, which is its most evolved part — the less myelin one finds.  Not only that, but “neurons in this part of the brain display a brand-new way of positioning myelin along their axons that has not been previously seen. They have ‘intermittent myelin’ with long axon tracts that lack myelin interspersed among myelin-rich segments.”
“Contrary to the common assumptions that neurons use a universal profile of myelin distribution on their axons, the work indicates that different neurons choose to myelinate their axons differently,” Arlotta said. “In classic neurobiology textbooks, myelin is represented on axons as a sequence of myelinated segments separated by very short nodes that lack myelin. This distribution of myelin was tacitly assumed to be always the same, on every neuron, from the beginning to the end of the axon. This new work finds this not to be the case.”
The results of the research by Arlotta and postdoctoral fellow Giulio Srubek Tomassy, the first author on the report, are published in the latest edition of the journal Science.
The paper is accompanied by a “perspective” by R. Douglas Fields of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the National Institutes of Health, who said that Arlotta and Tomassy’s findings raise important questions about the purpose of myelin, and “are likely to spark new concepts about how information is transmitted and integrated in the brain.”
Arlotta and Tomassy collaborated closely on the new work with postdoctoral fellow Daniel Berger of the Lichtman lab, which generated one of the two massive electron microscopy databases that made the work possible.
“The fact that it is the most evolved neurons, the ones that have expanded dramatically in humans, suggest that what we’re seeing might be the ‘future.’ As neuronal diversity increases and the brain needs to process more and more complex information, neurons change the way they use myelin to achieve more,” said Arlotta.
Tomassy said it is possible that these profiles of myelination “may be giving neurons an opportunity to branch out and ‘talk’ to neighboring neurons.” For example, because axons cannot make synaptic contacts when they are myelinated, one possibility is that these long myelin gaps may be needed to increase neuronal communication and synchronize responses across different neurons. He and Arlotta postulate that the intermittent myelin may be intended to fine-tune the electrical impulses traveling along the axons, in order to allow the emergence of highly complex neuronal behaviors.

neurosciencestuff:

Turning science on its head

Harvard neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years of neuroanatomy on its head.

Myelin, the electrical insulating material in the body long known to be essential for the fast transmission of impulses along the axons of nerve cells, is not as ubiquitous as thought, according to new work led by Professor Paola Arlotta of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) and the University’s Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, in collaboration with Professor Jeff Lichtman of Harvard’s Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology.

“Myelin is a relatively recent invention during evolution,” says Arlotta. “It’s thought that myelin allowed the brain to communicate really fast to the far reaches of the body, and that it has endowed the brain with the capacity to compute higher-level functions.”

In fact, loss of myelin is a feature in a number of devastating diseases, including multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia.

But the new research shows that despite myelin’s essential roles in the brain, “some of the most evolved, most complex neurons of the nervous system have less myelin than older, more ancestral ones,” said Arlotta, co-director of the HSCI neuroscience program.

What this means, she said, is that the higher one looks in the cerebral cortex — closer to the top of the brain, which is its most evolved part — the less myelin one finds.  Not only that, but “neurons in this part of the brain display a brand-new way of positioning myelin along their axons that has not been previously seen. They have ‘intermittent myelin’ with long axon tracts that lack myelin interspersed among myelin-rich segments.”

“Contrary to the common assumptions that neurons use a universal profile of myelin distribution on their axons, the work indicates that different neurons choose to myelinate their axons differently,” Arlotta said. “In classic neurobiology textbooks, myelin is represented on axons as a sequence of myelinated segments separated by very short nodes that lack myelin. This distribution of myelin was tacitly assumed to be always the same, on every neuron, from the beginning to the end of the axon. This new work finds this not to be the case.”

The results of the research by Arlotta and postdoctoral fellow Giulio Srubek Tomassy, the first author on the report, are published in the latest edition of the journal Science.

The paper is accompanied by a “perspective” by R. Douglas Fields of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the National Institutes of Health, who said that Arlotta and Tomassy’s findings raise important questions about the purpose of myelin, and “are likely to spark new concepts about how information is transmitted and integrated in the brain.”

Arlotta and Tomassy collaborated closely on the new work with postdoctoral fellow Daniel Berger of the Lichtman lab, which generated one of the two massive electron microscopy databases that made the work possible.

“The fact that it is the most evolved neurons, the ones that have expanded dramatically in humans, suggest that what we’re seeing might be the ‘future.’ As neuronal diversity increases and the brain needs to process more and more complex information, neurons change the way they use myelin to achieve more,” said Arlotta.

Tomassy said it is possible that these profiles of myelination “may be giving neurons an opportunity to branch out and ‘talk’ to neighboring neurons.” For example, because axons cannot make synaptic contacts when they are myelinated, one possibility is that these long myelin gaps may be needed to increase neuronal communication and synchronize responses across different neurons. He and Arlotta postulate that the intermittent myelin may be intended to fine-tune the electrical impulses traveling along the axons, in order to allow the emergence of highly complex neuronal behaviors.

I was treated to an amazing dinner last night at Sasa and he told me he loves me. It couldn’t have been more perfect.

I was treated to an amazing dinner last night at Sasa and he told me he loves me. It couldn’t have been more perfect.

oh-deir:

ACTUAL MESSAGE OF (500) DAYS OF SUMMER THAT NO ONE ACTUALLY REALIZES

scienceisbeauty:

Does evolution evolve under pressure?

(Source: liberalforever)

astrodidact:

mucholderthen:

Found! First Earth-Size Planet That Could Potentially Support Life
Astronomers have discovered a planet about the size of Earth,
orbiting its star in the zone where oceans of liquid water would be possible.

From Space.com

A study of the newly-found planet indicates it could have an Earth-like atmosphere and water at its surface. The planet Kepler-186f is the fifth planet of the star Kepler-186, 490 light-years away.

The planet has 1.11 times the Earth’s mass. Its radius is 1.1 times that of Earth. Kepler-186f orbits at 32.5 million miles (52.4 million kilometers) from its parent star. Its year is 130 Earth days. 

The planet orbits Kepler-186, an M-type dwarf star less than half as massive as the sun. Because the star is cooler than the sun, the planet receives solar energy less intense than that received by Mars in our solar system, despite the fact that Kepler-186f orbits much closer to its star.

I can’t put into words how much I love infographics.